Events

Loading Events

← Back to Events

Humanities 1, Room 202

February 2015

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Tracy Perkins

February 27, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

Friday Forum For Graduate Research: A weekly interdisciplinary colloquium series for sharing graduate research across the humanities. Join us for light refreshments and weekly presentations by your fellow graduate students. Fridays from 12:00 – 1:30pm in Humanities 1, Room 202.   Winter 2015 Schedule: January 16th - Jesica Siham Fernández, Social Psychology, "Latina/o Children as Cultural Citizens: Membership, Sense of Belonging, Space and Rights" January 23rd - Wes Modes, DANM, "A Secret History of American River People" January 30th - Aubrey…

Find out more »

March 2015

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Michael Wilson

March 6, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

Friday Forum For Graduate Research: A weekly interdisciplinary colloquium series for sharing graduate research across the humanities. Join us for light refreshments and weekly presentations by your fellow graduate students. Fridays from 12:00 – 1:30pm in Humanities 1, Room 202.   Winter 2015 Schedule: January 16th - Jesica Siham Fernández, Social Psychology, "Latina/o Children as Cultural Citizens: Membership, Sense of Belonging, Space and Rights" January 23rd - Wes Modes, DANM, "A Secret History of American River People" January 30th - Aubrey…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Jessica Calvanico

March 13, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Friday Forum For Graduate Research: A weekly interdisciplinary colloquium series for sharing graduate research across the humanities. Join us for light refreshments and weekly presentations by your fellow graduate students. Fridays from 12:00 – 1:30pm in Humanities 1, Room 202.   Winter 2015 Schedule: January 16th - Jesica Siham Fernández, Social Psychology, "Latina/o Children as Cultural Citizens: Membership, Sense of Belonging, Space and Rights" January 23rd - Wes Modes, DANM, "A Secret History of American River People" January 30th - Aubrey…

Find out more »

“Scholars” y tópicos: Alicia de Colombí-Monguió como paradigma

March 19, 2015 @ 9:45 am - 6:00 pm
Free

Conference organized by Jordi Aladro, Professor of Literature Wednesday 18th 7:00pm - Welcome for participants with a “vino español” (a generous donation from Instituto Cervantes, New York) Thursday 19th University of California, Santa Cruz. Humanities 1, Room 202 9:45am Introduction: Jordi Aladro Literature, University of California, Santa Cruz 10:15am “The Indefinite Garden: Ovid’s Metaphors and Metamorphoses in Chaucer’s Merchant’s Tale” Edward Milowicki Emeritus Professor, Mills College 10:45am "La traducción del hexámetro latino de Petrarca en castellano" Alejandro Higashi Área de…

Find out more »

April 2015

Friday Forum with Jess Whatcott: “Abolition Feminism Against Eugenics in California Prisons”

April 10, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available. For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com   Spring 2015 Schedule: 10 April…

Find out more »

Friday Forum with Evan Grupsmith: “Revolutionary Movement: Class Based Inclusion and Exclusion in the Cultural Revolution Chuanlian Movement”

April 17, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available. For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com   Spring 2015 Schedule: 10 April…

Find out more »

Friday Forum with Rose Grose: “A Sexual Empowerment Process for Heterosexual and Sexual Minority Women”

April 24, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available. For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com   Spring 2015 Schedule: 10 April…

Find out more »

May 2015

Friday Forum with Kali Rubaii: “Writing the Future with a Cement Pen: How to Concretize Displacement”

May 1, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available. For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com   Spring 2015 Schedule: 10 April…

Find out more »

In Loving Memory of Christopher Chitty

May 8, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Free

In Loving Memory of Chris Chitty: We mourn the loss of a friend and vibrant member of our academic community. However, his work is not lost and will continue to act on this world. We would like to invite everyone to join us for a reading and celebration of Chris’s academic writing in place of the presentation that he would have given on this day. This is an invitation to get to know Chris through his work or get to…

Find out more »

Digital Humanities Working Group / Work-in-Progress Conversation Aesthetics: Imagining Histories of Modern Lebanon, Fabiola Hanna

May 11, 2015 @ 12:15 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

Hanna will present her recent work, We are History: A People's History of Lebanon, a digital interface that collects varied oral histories of a people and presents them in a disruptive but dialogical manner. Using contemporary oral histories about the 1981 siege of Zahle, Lebanon, the software is given the goal of generating a narrative from the transcripts of said oral histories. Learn more online at http://fabiolahanna.com/weAreHistory.html Fabiola Hanna is a new media artist, software designer and activist currently using her skills to address…

Find out more »

Friday Forum with Keegan Cook Finberg: “Reading Poetry of the 1960s: The Fluxus Event Score as Multimedia Encounter”

May 15, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available. For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com   Spring 2015 Schedule: 10 April…

Find out more »

Friday Forum with Muiris Macgiollabhui: “Carrying The Green Bough: An Atlantic History of the United Irishmen, 1791-1830″

May 22, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available. For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com   Spring 2015 Schedule: 10 April…

Find out more »

Friday Forum with Ann Drevno: “Unintended Consequences of Regulatory Spotlighting Pesticides: The Case of California’s Central Coast Agricultural Waiver program”

May 29, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available. For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com   Spring 2015 Schedule: 10 April…

Find out more »

June 2015

Friday Forum with Veronika Zablotsky: "On the Question of Socialist Governmentality: Being Interested in Early Soviet Armenia”

June 5, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available. For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com   Spring 2015 Schedule: 10 April…

Find out more »

October 2015

Friday Forum: Joe Lehnert: “Managing Bodies-in-Motion: Algorithmic Surveillance and Predictive Policing.”

October 2, 2015 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Free

Join us Friday, October 2, at 12:00 PM in Humanities 1, Room 202, for the first Friday Forum for Graduate Research​ of 2015-16​! The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30 PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. The first meeting of the year…

Find out more »

Friday Forum: Candy Martinez "In Search of Decolonizing Representations: Learning from indigenous visual media in Oaxaca, Mexico"

October 9, 2015 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:30pm to 2pm and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. This meeting will feature Candy Martinez (LALS) presenting her talk “In Search of Decolonizing Representations: Learning from indigenous visual media in Oaxaca, Mexico". For more info, or to inquire about…

Find out more »

UCHRI Funding Workshop

October 9, 2015 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Free

UCHRI's Assistant Director Kelly Brown will provide an overview of UCHRI's funding opportunities for the 2016-17 year, with special attention to the four new calls for funding (digital humanities grant, supplemental graduate student funding grant, graduate dissertation support grant, and the junior faculty manuscript review grant). Kelly will be available to meet individually with faculty who would like to talk through potential projects. Please sign up for 1:1 meetings with IHR in advance of the workshop.

Find out more »

Friday Forum: Matthew Edwards "TBA"

October 16, 2015 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:30pm to 2pm and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. This meeting will feature Matthew Edwards (History of Consciousness). For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com

Find out more »

Friday Forum: AK Morais “Blundering Empire: The Smithsonian African Expedition of 1919-1920”

October 23, 2015 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:30pm to 2pm and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. This meeting will feature AK Morais (History of Consciousness) presenting his talk "Blundering Empire: The Smithsonian African Expedition of 1919-1920". For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster…

Find out more »

Friday Forum: Trey Highton “Surfing the Third Wave: Women’s Professional Surfing & the Ethics of Instagram”

October 30, 2015 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:30pm to 2pm and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. This meeting will feature Trey Highton (Literature) presenting his talk "Surfing the Third Wave: Women's Professional Surfing & the Ethics of Instagram". For more info, or to inquire about joining…

Find out more »

November 2015

Friday Forum: Samuael Topiary “The Anti-Representational Mode”

November 6, 2015 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:30pm to 2pm and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. This meeting will feature Samuael Topiary (Film & Digital Media) presenting his talk "The Anti-Representational Mode". For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the…

Find out more »

Friday Forum: Maya Iverson “Re-reading the Black Civil Rights Documentary ‘Sit-In'”

November 13, 2015 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:30pm to 2pm and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. This meeting will feature Maya Iverson (Sociology) presenting her talk "Re-reading the Black Civil Rights Documentary 'Sit-In'". Maya Iverson is a PhD student in Sociology. Her research focuses on black…

Find out more »

Friday Forum: Antoinette Wilson “Who Do You Think You Are: The Role of Racial Typicality on In-group Belonging and Stereotyping among African American Youth”

November 20, 2015 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free
Antoinette Wilson Friday Forum

Antoinette Wilson is a PhD candidate in Developmental Psychology. Her work investigates ways in which in-group members judge and validate racial authenticity (e.g., accusations of “acting White” and bias based on skin tone). Central to her research is exploring adolescents’ perceptions of “Who fits in?”, “Who is typical of our group”, and “Who is ‘really’ one of us?” Her dissertation research focuses on how two aspects of racial-ethnic typicality-- appearance and behavior--relate to variation in peer belonging and stereotyping among…

Find out more »

December 2015

Friday Forum: Lara Galas “Languaging the Landscape: A Translational Analysis of the Geopolitical in Nineteenth Century American Literature”

December 4, 2015 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:30pm to 2pm and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. This meeting will feature Lara Galas (Literature) presenting her talk "Languaging the Landscape: A Translational Analysis of the Geopolitical in Nineteenth Century American Literature". For more info, or to inquire…

Find out more »

January 2016

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: James Beneda

January 15, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

James Beneda "The Morally Incoherent Indoctrination of the American Soldier in Iraq: An Institutional Theory of Traumatic Experience" I take up an issue that most of us cannot help but see as a problem of individual psychology and restate it in terms of institutional politics and political ideologies. Starting from cognitive sociology and recent clinical research that reframes post-traumatic stress (PTSD) as ‘moral injury’, I argue that the traumatic experiences of American soldiers in the Iraq War resulted from flawed cultural and institutional indoctrination.   Friday…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Alex Moore

January 22, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Alex Moore "Captive Natures: Grotesque desire in the performative sculptures of Amber Hawk Swanson" In this paper I examine two projects by the artist Amber Hawk Swanson, Tilikum, 2011 and Lolita, 2013. Through a process of radical identification with the captive Orca whales Tilikum and Lolita, Hawk Swanson explores the ethics of aquatic theme park performances. I argue that the grotesque sculptures make visible the violence done to both humans and Orcas in the conceptions of nature, culture, and relationship manifested in the Shamu spectacle.  …

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Whitney Devos

January 29, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Whitney Devos "After Lives, After Palimpsests: Aimé Césaire & Claudia Rankine's (Caribbean) 'American Lyrics' " My project seeks to frame certain forms of poetry as attempts at experimental, non-linear historiography, examining the ways in which lyric and documentary impulses—so often pitted against one another critically—are intertwined from the inception of documentary poetics, an emerging multi-genre'd genre I read as quintessentially "American": North, South, and Central.   Friday Forum Winter 2015 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1, Room 202 A weekly interdisciplinary colloquium series for…

Find out more »

February 2016

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Sophia Magnone

February 5, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Sophia Magnone “There is risk in dealing with a partner”: “Bloodchild” and Interspecies Encounter I focus on “Bloodchild,” Octavia Butler’s story of extremely intimate yet profoundly troubling relations between species. On an extraterrestrial world, refugee humans become reproductive partners with their insectoid hosts, a relationship that mixes familial and sexual love with coercion and objectification. Yet in Butler’s own words, “Bloodchild” is a story of love, not slavery; she insists on the possibility of maintaining true affinity between profoundly different and unequal beings. What would it take…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Andrei Tcacenco

February 12, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Andrei Tcacenco "Constructing Socialism From Within: Entertainment and Media in the Soviet Home" My talk will explore the daily lived condition of real existing socialism during the latter part of the Soviet period. I will engage with official ideology while also showing how Soviet citizens shaped political discourse from the bottom-up by writing letters to local newspapers,television journals and local local radio stations.   Friday Forum Winter 2015 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1, Room 202 A weekly interdisciplinary colloquium series for sharing graduate…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Amanda Reyes

February 19, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Amanda Reyes Dangerous Visibility: The Visual Epistemology of Eugenics In the 1927 Buck v. Bell decision, the Supreme Court upheld a Virginia statute allowing sterilization of people determined to have “hereditary” mental illnesses such as “idiocy, imbecility, feeble-mindedness or epilepsy.” Key testimony asserted that her infant child had “a look about that is not quite normal” and descriptions of Carrie as “poor in looks” formed the basis of the argument that Carrie’s “feeble-mindedness” was hereditary. Thinking through the ways that representations of the Bucks were curated and…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Keith Spencer

February 26, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Keith Spencer "What We Talk About When We Talk To Aliens" Throughout the history of the search for ET, strategies for sending radio signals towards potentially inhabited planetary systems have always made unscientific assumptions and projections about alien culture, language, society and even economy. In my presentation I will deconstruct some recent scientific attempts to actively send out radio signals to other star systems and the hegemonic assumptions that are tied to the content of these radio compositions.   Friday Forum Winter 2015 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 –…

Find out more »

March 2016

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Laura Harrison

March 4, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Laura Harrison "Rights Are Not Justice: A Case Study in Campus Segregation and How University Accessibility Policies Do Violence To the Spirit of the Americans with Disabilities Act" “Rights Are Not Justice” is the product of a community facilitated project in public sociology and critical disability studies. This project outlines who and what is at stake when a campus elevator/building is inaccessible by uncovering the answers to thefollowing three questions: 1) who is affected by building segregation; 2) which bureaucratic structures maintain or operationalize the necessary…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Bristol Cave La-Costa

March 11, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Bristol Cave La-Costa "Sexual Policing and Immigration Policy in the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century" While much research has focused on Chinese Exclusion laws as mostly male-oriented, I consider how the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and 1875 Page Act, which excluded “immoral” immigrants, contributed to categories of sexual morality for Chinese women.   Friday Forum Winter 2015 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1, Room 202 A weekly interdisciplinary colloquium series for sharing graduate research across the humanities. Join us for…

Find out more »

April 2016

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Andrew Woods

April 8, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Andrew Woods "Punk the Academy (aka. Punk as Method) With a particular emphasis on the non-hierarchical, ambiguous, and D.I.Y. ethos of punk cultures, this paper makes the case that punk can be used as a lens informing our investigations of other objects, scenes, themes, and theories. The information of punk as method is not assuming punk "has all the answers," but rather that through subversive aesthetic shock and rupture, punk has the potential to open up new ways of thinking…

Find out more »

Anne MacNeil: “A new breed of critical edition: the role of digital humanities in transforming music scholarship”

April 14, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Free

Hands on (Digital) Humanities with Prof. Anne MacNeil Anne MacNeil will give a demonstration of her digital humanities project, IDEA Music, and the new software toolkit, Prospect, that powers it. In the last year, MacNeil’s close collaboration with programmer Michael Newton (UNC Digital Innovation Lab) and other members of the DIL community in developing Prospect has resulted in a powerful platform that has transformed IDEA Music into a multi-dimensional, multi-media publication that challenges the tradition concept of “critical edition”. The…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Claudia Lopez

April 15, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Claudia Lopez "Contesting 'Double Displacement': Rural displaces Persons, informal Settlements, and the 'Medellin Miracle'" This presentation examines the Comuna 8, a sector of the city of Medellin resisting displacement by urban renewal. I highlight a historic voting process in 2014, lead by a committee of displaced persons, to contest the implementation of the redeveloped plan. Friday Forum Spring 2016 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1, Room 202 A weekly interdisciplinary colloquium series for sharing graduate research across the humanities.…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Jordan Reznick

April 22, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Jordan Reznick  "Selfie Suburbia: Whites Online in the Early Twenty-First Century" Snapshot photography has been a means for white Americans to affirm their identities and collectively participate in circulating fictions about "normal" Americans that naturalize and legitimize ideals of whiteness. As whites became more precarious in the early twenty-first century, they adopted several new snapshot trends for signifying their enjoyment of increasingly fictional good life fantasies.   Friday Forum Spring 2016 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1, Room 202…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Erin McElroy

April 29, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Erin McElroy "Disposals through the #DigitalNomad: The Materialization of a Dispossessive Avatar"  The "Digital Nomad," an illusive figure flourishing alongside the growth of digital and network technologies, has conjured ideas of travel and freedom with the emergence of the Silicon Valley induced Tech Boom. I trace how digital networks, accompanied by fantasies of mobility, contribute to gentrifying economies that precipitate material dispossessions in locales undergoing economic and social transformation.   Friday Forum Spring 2016 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1,…

Find out more »

May 2016

Building in Scalar and Exploring the Future of Scholarly Publishing Workshop

May 4, 2016 @ 10:00 am - 12:30 pm
Free

With Craig Deitrich and Tara McPherson. This workshop will serve as an introduction to Scalar, a free, open source authoring and publishing platform designed for scholars writing media-rich, long-form, born-digital scholarship. Developed by The Alliance for Networking Visual Culture at the University of Southern California, Scalar allows scholars to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose that media with their own writing in a variety of ways; to annotate video, audio, images, source code and text using the platform’s built-in…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Raul Tadle

May 6, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Raul Tadle "FOMC Sentiment Extraction and its Transmission to Financial Markets" Since December 2004, the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), the governing board that determines U.S. monetary policy, has expedited the release of the minutes of its meetings from six to three weeks after the meetings are held. The reasoning behind this move is that markets benefit from having information from the minutes sooner. But does information in the minutes actually cause a reaction in the financial market?    …

Find out more »

POSTPONED PhD+: Research and Grants

May 13, 2016 @ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Free

This event has been postponed to June 3rd.   PhD+ Workshop Series Please join us for the launch of PhD+, our new series! We will meet monthly, over lunch, to discuss possible career paths for humanities PhDs, online identity issues, internship possibilities, work/life balance, elements of style, grants/fellowships and much, more more. October 9, 2015: Alternative Academia Panel November 6, 2015: Internship Info Session December 4, 2015: Coding for Humanists January 8, 2016: Research Tools and Methods February 5, 2016:…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Cathy Thomas

May 13, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Cathy Thomas "Defining the Fête: The Utopian Potential of Drag, Disease and Diaspora in Oonya Kempadoo's Carnival Imaginary" The catharsis associated with Caribbean Carnivale has always been situated in the body. This paper considers the fête bodies of a transnational costume designer, the Queen of the Band and a gay reveler living with AIDS in Oonya Kempadoo's tragicomic novel All Decent Animals as allegorical and political sites for producing and produced by trauma.   Friday Forum Spring 2016 Schedule Fridays, 12:30…

Find out more »

Marjorie Agosin: “Translating the Soul: Meditations on Poetry”

May 19, 2016 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Free

Marjorie Agosin is the Luella La Mer Slaner Professor in Latin American Studies and Professor of Spanish at Wellesley College. Professor Agosin's poetry is inspired by social justice and the dedicated to the remembrance and memorialization of traumatic historical events in the Americas and in European holocaust. As a Chilean-American of Jewish heritage Agosin's poetry enshrines women's human rights. As a literary scholar she has published work on Pablo Neruda, María Luisa Bombal, and Gabriela Mistral. She is especially well known for preserving and…

Find out more »

Jonathan Ellis: “Motivated Reasoning, Heavy and Light”

May 19, 2016 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Free

At least once a quarter the Philosophy Department hosts a Works-in-Progress presentation by a member of the faculty. The format may vary from a traditional talk to a communal environment allowing for ideas to be tested and feedback solicited. All members of the campus community and interested public are welcome to attend. Jonathan Ellis Motivated Reasoning, Heavy and Light Thursday, May 19, 2016 Location: Humanities 1, Room 202 Time: 4:00 - 5:30 Coffee, tea, and cookies served.

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Trung Nguyen

May 20, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Trung Nguyen "War Material: Vietnamese Objects of Post-War Subjectivity" Hong-An Truong and Dinh Q. Le are two widely received diasporic Vietnamese artists whose installations have engaged with the interpretative terrains and problematics of memory, subjectivity, and colonialism through Vietnamese historical experience. This presentation will study two of their respective pieces that explicitly confront modes of inhabiting a subjectivity constituted by the material remainders of war.   Friday Forum Spring 2016 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1, Room 202 A…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Rebecca Ora

May 27, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Rebecca Ora "Filming Israel From Afar: Ambivalent Diasporic Visions in Performative Non-Fiction" Citing her recent short film The Intifada-ing and the work of other Jewish American women filmmakers, I discuss the ability of performative nonfiction to map new geographic territories through ethical panic and identity-loss responding to diasporic relationships with Israel-Palestine. This paper cults from theorizations of documentary as well as Joseph Roach's writings on surrogation and Circum-Atlantic performance.   Friday Forum Spring 2016 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1,…

Find out more »

BIOS Research Colloquium: Historicizing Surveillance

May 27, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Free

BIOS Research Colloquium: Historicizing Surveillance Featuring Guest Speakers: Simone Browne and Simon A. Cole Friday May 27th, 2-5 pm, Humanities 1 Room 202   Simone Browne, Draw a black line through it: On the Surveillance of Blackness Situating blackness as an absented presence in the field of surveillance studies, this talk questions how a realization of the conditions of blackness— the historical, the present, and the historical present can help social theorists understand our contemporary conditions of surveillance. Simone Browne…

Find out more »

June 2016

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Veronika Zablotsky

June 3, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Veronika Zablotsky "Dealing with the East: Orientalism and the Ideas of Eurasia in Contemporary Geopolitics" In this talk, I mobilize Edward Said's critique of Orientalism (1978) as a Europrean "style of thought," a "corporate institution" and a "systematic discipline" that produces, manages and deals with the "Orient" by means of discourse to think about the idea of "Eurasia" and its uses in contemporary geopolitics.   Friday Forum Spring 2016 Schedule Fridays, 12:30 – 2:00pm Humanities 1, Room 202 A weekly interdisciplinary…

Find out more »

October 2016

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Mikki Stelder

October 14, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free
Friday Forum for Graduate Research

"Homozionism: 'From the Closet into the Knesset'" My project focuses on the role of sexual politics in Israel's settler colonial occupation of Palestine, international (queer) complicities, and anti-colonial queer resistance. For this presentation I look forward to discuss the first chapter of my dissertation that charts the globally celebrated genealogy of Israel's gay movement from "the closet into the Knesset" (Kama 2011). I argue that this move enabled what Palestinian queer activist call Israel's pinkwashing campaign to emerge. Pinkwashing describes…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Kali Rubaii

October 21, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free
Friday Forum for Graduate Research

"Enemy Inside Out: Birth Defects in Fallujah" Hotly debated and widely misunderstood is the epidemic of birth defects in Fallujah, Iraq. While the possibility of knowing the exact cause of this epidemic is diluted by ongoing war, layers of chemical toxicity, and mass displacement/destruction of doctors, patients, and medical facilities; the surrounding enviro-medical discourse is informative. It indexes a broader debate about the politics of scientific research: guilt, responsibility, and the question of reparations to the Iraq people in the…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Mitchell Winter

October 28, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free
Friday Forum for Graduate Research

"Polemics of Disintegration: Advaita Metaphysics in the Works of Alejandro Jodorowsky" The Chilean artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (b. 1929) often engages with non-linearity and non-sense as narrative devices in his work. Throughout his career Jodorowsky's thematic repertoire has adopted elements of the Kabbalistic science of the Marseille tarot, European alchemy, and New Age formulations of Hindu and Zen Buddhist thought. I attempt to trave the genealogical articulation of Jodorowsky's brand of filmmaking and artistic practice by working through his depiction of…

Find out more »

November 2016

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Hahkyung Darline Kim

November 4, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free
Friday Forum for Graduate Research

"Historicizing Interviews: A Mode of (Re)living and (Re)writing Memories of the Korean War through Documentary" How can we write a history of the officially unsaid and the unsayable? My talk focuses on the case of the Korean War whose language of antagonism and ideological conflict remains very much alive in Korean society today. I will present parts of MemoRandom, my most recent documentary project based on inconsistent accounts of events during the war involving an alleged communist family, and examine…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Sophie PappenheimBlack

November 18, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free
Friday Forum for Graduate Research

"Black Storm Clouds and a Queer Yellow Light: Reading the Affective Edges of Symbolism in Maru" My project is to read postcolonial novels that have typically been analyzed as representations of postcolonial politics and instead attend to the nonrepresentational aspects of their language: namely, their affect and literariness. In this talk I focus on Bessie Head's novella Maru (1971), which itself is concerned with identity, racial prejudice, and tribal politics, as well as representation as mode of signification and figuration,…

Find out more »

December 2016

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Nicole Vandermeer

December 2, 2016 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free
Friday Forum for Graduate Research

"Writing Hawai'i into the Nation: Narrative Re-mapping in Mark Twain's Letter's s a Colonial Prelude to Annexation" This portion of my dissertation project examines the 1866 letters written by Mark Twain (while dispatched by The Sacramento Union in Hawai'i) as engaged in the colonial process of cartographic incorporation by encouraging American ambitions in, and imaginings of, Hawai'i as a space for continuing expansion westward. In viewing the letters through the lens of cartography, their function as re-making Hawai'i into an…

Find out more »

January 2017

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Sarah Papazoglakis

January 27, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
friday forum

American Philanthropy and "Aggressive Altruism" in Richard Wright's Native Son and Miguel Angel Asturias' The Green Pope My dissertation interrogates the narrative power of American philanthropy in the story of the United States' rise as a global superpower in the twentieth century. For this presentation, I will present an excerpt of a chapter that considers how philanthropy permeates representations of hemispheric American relationships in the interwar period. I read Richard Wright's Native Son (1940) and Miguel Angel Asturias's El Papa…

Find out more »

February 2017

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Rachel Shellabarger

February 3, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
friday forum

Sustainable Happy cows: Change and Sustainability in California Dairies  California dairy advertisements often feature happy cows, but they mask social and environmental concerns over industrial milk production. Currently, California dairy producers face a mix of challenges with severe drought, regulation of methane emissions from cows, uncertain changes in milk pricing policies, and future implementation of more robust framework labor laws. These converging pressures challenge the industrial mode of dairy production utilized by many California dairies, and may pave a path…

Find out more »

Spanish Studies Colloquium: Human Rights and US Policy in Post-Coup Honduras: a talk by Dana Frank

February 8, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Human Rights and US Policy in Post-Coup Honduras: a talk by Dana Frank Dana Frank is professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the author of Bananeras:Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America, among other books. Since the 2009 coup her articles about human rights and US policy in Honduras have appeared in the New York Times, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, World Policy Review, Politico Magazine, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, The Nation,…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Kyuhyun Han

February 10, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
friday forum

Sewing the Forest like a state: Forest Management, Wildlife Conservation, and Center-Periphery Relations in Northeast China, 1949 - 1965 My research aims to counter the prevalent premise that Mao-era China (1945-1976) was devoid of environmental consciousness or concern with environmental protection, and places Chinese policy in the context of the international development of environmental consciousness during that time. It will show the ways in which early Mao-Era Chinese scientists actively participated in and were influenced by the global discussion of…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Yulia Gilichinskaya

February 17, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
FREE
friday forum

Israel and Palestine: The Landscape of Separation The Palestinian people in Gaza and the West Bank not only live under the occupation of Israel but also, contained behind the Wall that Israel erected, populate a space of physical, social, and cultural isolation. The Wall severs communities, people's access to services, livelihoods and religious and cultural amenities. It fragments not only the land, but also the very social fabric of the Palestinian people. In search for a landscape of hope, Yulia…

Find out more »

Spanish Studies Colloquium: Neo-Extractivismo y Cultura en América Latina

February 22, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Neo-extractivismo y cultura en América Latina: A Talk by Héctor Hoyos Se propone un modelo crítico que responde a las nuevas formas del capitalismo en la era digital. Tras examinar productos culturales que permiten criticar patrones de acumulación actuales,se cuestiona el rol de lo literario como elemento disruptivo en regímenes de producción semánticos e industriales, discutiendo obras críticas de Ericka Beckman y Fernando Ortiz, así como el cuento “Historia de un computador” del chileno Alejandro Zambra y el policial Coltán…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Maggie Wander

February 24, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
free
friday forum

"Its Ok,  We're Safe Here": Cultural and Eco Activism in the Film Windjarrameru (The Stealing C*nt$) Since 2008, the Karrabing Film Collective has made four films about the various cultural, political, and social realists of being Aboriginal in twenty-first century Australia. Their 2015 film, Windjarrameru (The Stealing C*nt$), highlights how social inequalities experienced every day in Aboriginal communities are inseparable from environmental destruction. Both issues are intertwined in Australia's colonial history; due to the centrality of landscape and environment in…

Find out more »

March 2017

Audun Dahl: The Empirical Reality of Moral Reasoning

March 2, 2017 @ 3:15 pm - 5:00 pm
audahl

Many theories have viewed reason and reasoning as essential to making moral judgments. In contrast, recent psychological proposals have contested the centrality of reasoning, arguing that most or many moral judgments are based on automatic, emotional reactions (sometimes termed "institutions," e.g. Greene, 2013; Haidt 2013). These proposals are based on experiments taken to show that people are sometimes unable to justify their moral evaluations and that such evaluations are sensitive to factors presumed morally irrelevant. In this talk, I will…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Chessa Adsit-Morries

March 3, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
friday forum

Creative Ecologies of Practice: Collaborative Agential Modes of Eco-Aesthetic Pedagogy This presentation will discuss two collaborative environmental art projects aimed at creating experimental and experiential trans-disciplinary pedagogical practices. Both projects are examples of "creative ecologies of practice" enabling and requiring multiple modes of thought, multiple modes of encounter, and multiple modes of pedagogy. They are imaginative and speculative, require resonance and creative response, and include practices and discourses of eco-aesthetics to foster sites of refuge, sites of agency and cities…

Find out more »

IHR Public Fellows Info Session 1

March 8, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am

IHR PUBLIC FELLOWS Deadline: April 30, 2017 Amount: Up to $5,000 Number of Fellowships: 3 or more (based on the availability of funds) These fellowships will provide the opportunity for humanities doctoral students to contribute to research, programming, communications and fundraising at non-profit organizations, cultural institutions, or companies and are meant to allow the students to apply and expand their skills in a non-academic setting while engaged in graduate study. Majority of the work should be completed during Summer 2017.…

Find out more »

April 2017

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Jaclyn N. Schultz

April 21, 2017 @ 12:20 pm - 2:00 pm
FFposter

Advertising Female Futurity: Children's Books Printed as Advertisements in the U.S., 1850-1870 In this presentation, I examine children's books printed as advertisemtns between 1850 and 1870 that were directed at female children. Beginning around 1850, companies produced books that served as advertisements but took the shape of children's primers, rhymes, or storybooks. This presentation carefully studies these books to uncover consumerist lessons directed at children as well as contemporaneous understandings of the women of the future. By examining how female…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Baizhu Chen

April 28, 2017 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
FFposter

Do Lenders Value the Right Characteristics?: Evidence from Peer-to-Peer Lending Using a unique dataset of peer-to-peer lending with detailed loan and borrower information, I study the following research questions:|1) What are the borrower characteristics that lenders value when choosing which loans to fund?; and (2) Do lenders value the correct characteristics with respect to minimizing to probability of default? In this online context, the researcher observes everything that the lender does, enabling unbiased estimation of the borrower characteristics that lenders…

Find out more »

May 2017

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Danielle Crawford

May 5, 2017 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
FFposter

Shooting Cameras and Shooting Weapons: U.S. Military Violence and Ecological Ruin in Coppola's Apocalypse Now This presentation examines the shooting history of Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979), which was shot on the Philippine island of Luzon. I investigate the collision between Hollywood's shooting of cameras and the U.S. military's shooting of weapons, and the ways these forms of violence intertwine on the set of this Vietnam War film. While the film attempts to blur the geographic boundaries between Vietnam…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Kristen Laciste

May 12, 2017 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
FFposter

From Maidservant to Anomalous Aristocrat: Imaging and Imagining Dido Elizabeth Belle The double portrait of cousins, entitled, Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray, is truly an anomaly in 18th century British art. Depicting two aristocratic women, one back and one white, the painting inspired the 2014 film, Belle. Incorporating the fancy and flair of period dramas, the creators of Belle fabricated a largely fictional account, envisioning Dido with a generous measure of agency and influence despite being black and…

Find out more »

Maudemarie Clark “Nietzsche’s Nihilism”

May 18, 2017 @ 3:15 pm - 5:00 pm
Maudemarie Clark "Nietzsche's Nihilism"

Nietzsche claims that in realating the "advent of nihilism," he is relating "the history of the next two centuries." He also claims that he himself has been a nihilist, but that he had now left it behind, "outside of self." In this paper, I offer an account of how Nietzsche understands nihilism and of how to understand his own (early and middle-period) work as nihilistic. I argue (against Bernard Reginster) that the nihilism of interest to Nietzsche is not, or…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Kara Hisatake

May 19, 2017 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Free
FFposter

Pidgin Comedy in Hawai'i: The Queer Resignification of Settler Culture In 1970s Hawai'i, Pidgin, also known as Hawai'i Creole english, was the major medium of comedy because it was the language, visual culture, and attitude of the islands, a stark contrast to imported U.S. settle norms. Rap Reiplinger was a household name with his 1982 TV special Rap's Hawaii, which addressed local culture, politics, and tourism. Analyzing Reiplinger's TV special, I claim that his Pidgin comedy resignifies settler culture and…

Find out more »

Dr. Nikhil Anand: “Waterlines: Uncertainty and the Future Urban”

May 23, 2017 @ 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

The IHR Research Cluster on Race, Violence, Inequality, and the Anthropocene presents Dr. Nikhil Anand Associate Professor of Anthropology University of Pennsylvania. Nikhil Anand’s research focuses on the political ecology of urban infrastructures, and the social and material relations that they entail. He is the author of Hydraulic City: Water and the Infrastructures of Citizenship in Mumbai (Duke, 2017). His talk is based on a new project that focuses on the uncertain boundaries of land and water in Mumbai, looking…

Find out more »

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Yuki Obayashi

May 26, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
FFposter

"This is Your Life": Hiroshima Maidens and the American ideological superiority in the midst of the Cold War In 1955, twenty-five female victims of the atomic bombing flown to the United States and received extensive plastic surgery to correct severe deformity from keloids. Initiated by the American journalist Norman Cousins and the Japanese minister Tanimoto Kiyoshi, this project was supported on multiple fronts in the United States. This paper analyzed the American capitalistic mode of generosity from the TV program,…

Find out more »

Critical Race & Ethnic Studies Works In Progress

May 26, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Free

"Delinquency As Labor" Chrissy Anderson-Zavala Chrissy Anderson-Zavala is a PhD candidate in education with designated emphases in critical race and ethnic studies and feminist studies at UC Santa Cruz. Her dissertation, How to Write ‘Trouble/d Youth,’ bridges participatory ethnographic work in a continuation high school and reading practices that “track the figure” of “trouble/d youth” in district and state-level archives to explore how narratives of young people as “trouble” (threat) or “troubled” (at-risk) inform the limits and possibilities of schooling.     "BioRobotics: Surveillance at the…

Find out more »

June 2017

Friday Forum for Graduate Research: Angela Nguyen

June 2, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
FFposter

"Mom, can you help me with my homework?" Identifying Tools and Conditions for Intergenerational Dialogue Among Southeast Asian Refugees and Their Children The collective memories of the Southeast Asian diaspora are interwoven with histories of war and colonial violence that continue to be felt in everyday experiences as hauntings. Post-war generations are often without access to resources for contextualizing and deconstructing these lived realities. I discuss my reflexive process while interviewing my family about their experiences with the American-Vietnam War…

Find out more »

December 2017

CRES: Works in Progress featuring Sheeva Sabati & Nick Mitchell

December 7, 2017 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Find out more »

January 2018

Ram Neta: “Puzzle of Transparency”

January 18, 2018 @ 3:15 pm - 5:00 pm
Free

The Puzzle of Transparency As you and I are out for a walk, I notice that the sky is getting cloudier and so I ask you "do you believe that it's going to rain?" In response to this question, you normally do not pay attention to your own states of mind, but rather to the way the sky looks and the air feels. But if I'm asking about what you believe, then shouldn't you pay attention to your own state…

Find out more »

March 2018

Cathy Davidson Workshop

March 2, 2018 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Free

Cathy Davidson will offer a hands-on workshop on engaged pedagogy with the Teaching and Learning in the Humanities Now research cluster, working with the research group to address a topic of their choice. Students from Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts are all encouraged to attend. Come prepared with a pedagogy question to dive into. For copies of Cathy Davidson's book The New Education, please email the Center for Innovations in Teaching and Learning at citl@ucsc.edu Presented by UC Santa Cruz Humanities Institute and…

Find out more »

IPAs are like a Hoppy Craft Beer: Acquiring a Taste for Task-based Language Teaching and Integrated Performance Assessments

March 14, 2018 @ 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
Free

The Department of Languages and Applied Linguistics is pleased to present: “IPAs are Like a Hoppy Craft Beer: Acquiring a Taste for Task-based Language Teaching and Integrated Performance Assessments” Jill Pellettieri, Ph.D. This workshop focuses on the Integrated Performance Assessment (IPA) as simply one specific model of task-based language learning and assessment. Like the hoppy beer, it pairs well in some settings but not in others. We will critically examine the IPA with an eye towards identifying its strengths and…

Find out more »

April 2018

Reading Seminar: Jeffrey Santa Ana’s Transpacific Ecological Imagination

April 2, 2018 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
A flyer for the event is shown.

Jeffrey Santa Ana is Associate Professor of English and affiliated faculty in Asian & Asian American Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Stony Brook University, the State University of New York. He is the author of Radical Feelings: Asian America in a Capitalist Culture of Emotion (Temple University Press, 2015). He is currently writing a book entitled Transpacific Ecological Imagination: Environmental Memory in the Asian-Pacific Diaspora.  For pre-circulated readings, please email Christine Hong at cjhong@ucsc.edu.

Find out more »

Humanities Institute Public Fellows Info Session

April 10, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Please join us for an information session about The Humanities Institute's Public Fellows program on Tuesday, April 10 from 12:00-1:00 pm in Humanities Room 202 where we will hear from our 2017 cohort of Public Fellows, and also cover the opportunities for public fellows this coming summer which include new partner organizations. In addition, we are launching a new public fellows program that will allow students to work as public fellows during the school year (we will cover tuition, fees,…

Find out more »

May 2018

Philosophy Colloquium: Ori Simchen

May 3, 2018 @ 3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

“Realism and Instrumentalism in Metaphysical Explanation” Ori Simchen is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Professor Simchen works mostly in the philosophy of language and metaphysics. Most recently he's been working on metasemantics, or foundational semantics, and its relation to formal semantics. He is particularly interested in how to think about intentionality (or aboutness) in light of the pronouncements of contemporary semantic theory.

Find out more »

Philosophy Colloquium: Gene Witmer

May 10, 2018 @ 3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

“Metaphysics and A Priori Vindication” Is there reason to expect any interesting kind of a priori access to metaphysical truths of the sort often in dispute in contemporary philosophy? In this paper I zero in on truths about what is metaphysically necessary and about the essences or natures of things as key topics in metaphysics and aim to delineate a well-motivated thesis about a priori access to such. After examining a few approaches that don't succeed, I introduce and defend…

Find out more »

Applied Linguistics Colloquia

May 23, 2018 @ 3:30 pm - 7:00 pm
A poster, divided into 2 columns is shown. On the left, info for the event and on the right, the presenters and their presentation titles.
Find out more »

Jeff Michno: “Nicaragua Y ¿Vos, tú o usted?”

May 29, 2018 @ 5:15 pm - 7:00 pm
A green flyer with text is shown. One image, on the right, shows two men and a motorcycle.

  In this talk, I highlight variation in second-person singular pronoun use (vos, tú, and usted) by local residents of a rural Nicaraguan community experiencing linguistic and cultural contact driven by tourism. I demonstrate that pronoun selection can vary according to the amount of contact locals have with outsiders in their community, providing evidence that locals use tú, a variant reported as virtually absent from Nicaraguan Spanish, with both outsiders and other locals. Utilizing local commentary, I show that this…

Find out more »

November 2018

Book Presentation: Jai Sen’s The Movements of Movements

November 27, 2018 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Join us as Jai Sen discusses his ambitious anthology on social movements with a panel of commentators including Michelle Glowa (CIIS), Deborah Gould (UCSC), and Patrick King (UCSC). Jai Sen is an activist/researcher/author on and in movement. Earlier an organizer, then a researcher into popular movement, for the past decade and more he has worked to promote critical engagement with the World Social Forum and emerging world movement - as moderator of the listserv WSFDiscuss and as coeditor of several books including…

Find out more »

Invitation and Object: Reframing the Study of Palestine

November 29, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

"Welcome to Gaza: On the Politics of Invitation and the Right to Tourism" Jennifer Kelly, Associate Professor, UCSC  In between Israeli military incursions, Palestinians in Gaza have described their colonial condition and navigated their cleavage from the rest of Palestine through virtual collaborative projects that rehearse, satirize, and reimagine tourism. These projects refuse to position Gaza as solely a site of suffering, a site where tourism could never flourish; they instead ask what it would mean if Palestinians in Gaza…

Find out more »

February 2019

Breakfast seminar: All the Power to the People!

February 22, 2019 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Critical Race and Ethnic Studies, Pilipinx Historical Dialogue, Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center, and Anakbayan Santa Cruz are pleased to present: ALL POWER TO THE PEOPLE! Asian American Radicalism, Bay Area Universities, and the Third World Liberation Front Featuring TWLF veterans Bruce Occena, Vicci Wong, and Emil de Guzman Breakfast seminar with pre-circulated materials * Friday, February 22, 2019, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Humanities 202 * For access to materials, please contact Christine Hong (cjhong@ucsc.edu) See also: An Intergenerational Dialogue and…

Find out more »

April 2019

Barry Lam – Fighting the Future: The Philosophy of Predictive Algorithms in Criminal Justice

April 11, 2019 @ 3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

At different stages of the criminal justice system, from policing, bail hearings, and sentencing, computerized algorithms are replacing human decision-making in determining where to police, who to arrest, who goes to jail, and who goes free. This talk will introduce people to how these algorithms work, the under-appreciated moral problems with their implementation, and how the future of criminal justice depends on decisions we make now about the risks we are willing to tolerate for public safety. Organized by the…

Find out more »

Doing Scholarship in Public: Podcasts, Print Media, and the Urgency of the Humanities

April 16, 2019 @ 3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

An informal conversation and open Q & A with Barry Lam about his work as a public scholar, launching a podcast, and his advice about getting started in public scholarship.

Find out more »

May 2019

Veda Popovici-History Does (Not) Repeat Itself: Speculative Histories of Post-Revolutionary Romania

May 23, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
history does not repeat itself

Veda Popovici’s work explores the limits of political imagination. In this talk, she presents her latest political art project: a mapping of collective dreams and desires of revolutionary events in the context of post-1989 Romania. Laying out seven radical future pasts, these are stories that could have been, but never happened...feminist unions, Eastern European migrants antifascist organizing, anticapitalist campaigns, solidarity movements between students and coal miners. Based in Bucharest, Veda Popovici holds a PhD in Art History and Theory from…

Find out more »

October 2019

David Eng: Racial Melancholia, Racial Dissociation – On the Social and Psychic Lives of Asian Americans

October 15, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Please join David L. Eng for a discussion of his new book, Racial Melancholia, Racial Dissociation: On the Social and Psychic Lives of Asian Americans (Duke University Press, 2019), co-authored with Shinhee Han. The book draws on case histories from the mid-1990s to the present to explore the social and psychic predicaments of Asian American young adults from Generation X to Generation Y. Combining critical race theory with several strands of psychoanalytic thought and clinical practice, Eng and Han develop the concepts of racial melancholia…

Find out more »

November 2019

After Ursula Discussion

November 15, 2019 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Join us to discuss excerpts from authors Karen Joy Fowler, Molly Gloss, Nisi Shawl, and Kim Stanley Robinson. Please email Micah Perks at (meperks@ucsc.edu) for the readings and to RSVP for the discussion. Kim Stanley Robinson is an American science fiction writer. He is the author of more than twenty books, including the international bestselling Mars trilogy, and more recently Red Moon, New York 2140, Aurora, Shaman, Green Earth, and 2312. He was sent to the Antarctic by the U.S.…

Find out more »

Eve Zyzik: Spanish Studies Colloquium

November 19, 2019 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Spelling is an aspect of literacy that causes significant difficulties for Spanish heritage language learners. The current research study targets one of the most problematic areas of Spanish orthography: substitution of “s” and “c” letters to represent /s/. Participants (n=72) were young adults, heritage speakers of Spanish, who completed a dictation task in addition to a standardized measure of proficiency. The results indicate a main effect for cognates (Spanish/English cognates are spelled more accurately), but no effect for letter. In other words, the data show that…

Find out more »

Discussion with Peg Alford Pursell and Sophia Shalmiyev

November 22, 2019 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Join us to discuss excerpts from Mother Winter, a memoir by Sophia Shalmiyev and A Girl Goes Into The Forest, a collection of short stories by Peg Alford Pursell. Please email Micah Perks at (meperks@ucsc.edu) for the readings and to RSVP for the discussion. Peg Alford Pursell is the author of A Girl Goes Into the Forest, (Dzanc Books, July 2019), and of Show Her A Flower, A Bird, A Shadow, the 2017 Indies Book of the Year for Literary…

Find out more »

January 2020

Kenyon Branon: Locality and Anti-Locality – Two Case Studies

January 23, 2020 @ 1:30 pm

Much work in syntax suggests that there is a strong preference --- given two or more options --- for shorter dependencies over longer dependencies, often referred to as a locality condition. Cases where these conditions are apparently violated are therefore a general topic of interest. This talk presents two case studies of apparent violations of locality in A-movement which prove problematic for current approaches to the phenomenon. In both Luganda and Haya , as well as Tongan , A-movement is able to cross…

Find out more »

Bronwyn Bjorkman: Realizing Syntax

January 30, 2020 @ 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

For more information, please see visit the Linguistics Department Website.

Find out more »

February 2020

Linguistics Colloquium: Nikos Angelopoulos

February 6, 2020 @ 1:30 pm

  Please see the Linguistics Department website for more information.

Find out more »

May 2020

CANCELLED: Nancy Luxon – Switch Points of Power: Psychodynamics of state legitimation and neoauthoritarianism

May 4, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Recent political trends not just in the United States but globally have led to speculation about the resurgence of authoritarianism and an “authoritarian personality.” As the usual orientations of Left and Right held in place by a liberal status quo begin to falter, social science looks for new frameworks through which to describe these political phenomena and to analyze the kind of challenge they pose to existing liberal or neoliberal institutions. With this paper, I argue that these contemporary political…

Find out more »

October 2021

Feminism in Mexico: Intergenerational and Transnational

October 12 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

This panel discussion will be led by Distinguished Professor Eli Bartra, Professor of Feminist Studies at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico City. Professor Bartra is the author of "Feminism and Folk Art" (2018) and "Women in Mexican Folk Art" (2011), and is a leading activist on feminist issues in Mexico City. Also on the panel is Anna Lee Mraz Bartra, an independent scholar from Mexico who holds a Ph.D. in Political and Social Sciences from the Universidad Autonoma de Mexico,…

Find out more »

History and Modern Media – book talk with John Mraz

October 12 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In this lecture, Professor John Mraz, Research Professor, Instituto de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Mexico on “History and Modern Media", will discuss his most recent book published in 2021 by Vanderbilt University Press. John is a distinguished scholar on Mexican photo history and visual culture in Mexico. He is also the author of “Photographing the Mexican Revolution" (2012) and “Looking for Mexico: Modern Visual Culture and National Identity" (2009). Moreover, John is a UCSC alum and…

Find out more »
+ Export Events